What is a Pronoun (Explained for Beginner’s)

A pronoun is a word that is used to replace a noun in a sentence. It helps to avoid repetition and makes the sentence more concise. Pronouns can refer to people, animals, things, or ideas. They play an important role in communication and help to make our language more efficient. There are different types of pronouns, such as personal pronouns (I, you, he, she, it, we, they), possessive pronouns (mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs), demonstrative pronouns (this, that, these, those), and many more. Pronouns are an essential part of grammar and are used in everyday speech and writing.

Key Takeaways

Pronoun Type Examples
Personal Pronouns I, you, he, she, it, we, they
Possessive Pronouns mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs
Demonstrative Pronouns this, that, these, those
Interrogative Pronouns who, whom, whose, which, what
Relative Pronouns who, whom, whose, which, that
Reflexive Pronouns myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, yourselves, themselves
Indefinite Pronouns all, another, any, anybody, anyone, anything, each, everybody, everyone, everything, few, many, nobody, none, one, several, some, somebody, someone, something, etc.

Understanding Pronouns: A Basic Definition

What is a Pronoun in Grammar?

In the English language, a pronoun is a word that is used to replace a noun or noun phrase. It is a fundamental part of grammar and plays a crucial role in communication. Pronouns help us avoid repetition and make our sentences more concise and clear. They allow us to refer to people, places, things, or ideas without constantly repeating their names.

Pronouns come in various forms and serve different functions in a sentence. Let’s explore the simple definition of a pronoun and the different types of pronouns.

Simple Definition of a Pronoun

A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun in a sentence. It helps us avoid repetition and adds variety to our language. Pronouns can refer to people, places, things, or ideas. They are an essential part of English grammar and are used in everyday conversation and writing.

Types of Pronouns

There are several types of pronouns in the English language. Each type has its own specific function and usage. Here are some common types of pronouns:

  1. Personal Pronouns: These pronouns refer to specific people or things. They include words like I, you, he, she, it, we, and they. Personal pronouns can be further categorized into subject pronouns (e.g., I, you, he) and object pronouns (e.g., me, you, him).

  2. Possessive Pronouns: These pronouns show ownership or possession. They include words like mine, yours, his, hers, ours, and theirs. Possessive pronouns indicate that something belongs to someone or something.

  3. Reflexive Pronouns: These pronouns are used when the subject and object of a sentence are the same. They include words like myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, yourselves, and themselves. Reflexive pronouns emphasize the action being performed by the subject.

  4. Demonstrative Pronouns: These pronouns point to specific people, places, or things. They include words like this, that, these, and those. Demonstrative pronouns help us indicate the proximity or distance of the noun being referred to.

  5. Indefinite Pronouns: These pronouns refer to non-specific or unidentified people or things. They include words like anyone, someone, everyone, nobody, something, anything, and everything. Indefinite pronouns are used when we don’t need to be specific about the noun being referred to.

  6. Relative Pronouns: These pronouns introduce relative clauses and connect them to the main clause. They include words like who, whom, whose, which, and that. Relative pronouns help us provide additional information about a noun in the sentence.

  7. Interrogative Pronouns: These pronouns are used to ask questions. They include words like who, whom, whose, which, and what. Interrogative pronouns help us gather information about a person or thing.

Understanding the different types of pronouns is essential for constructing grammatically correct sentences. It is important to use the appropriate pronoun based on the context and function it serves in the sentence.

Pronouns play a vital role in maintaining clarity and coherence in our language. They help us avoid repetition, add variety to our sentences, and make our communication more efficient. By using pronouns correctly, we can express ourselves effectively and convey our thoughts and ideas with precision.

Now that we have a basic understanding of pronouns, let’s explore their usage in English grammar, pronoun examples, pronoun antecedent, pronoun agreement, pronoun case, pronoun reference, and pronoun rules.

Different Types of Pronouns

Pronouns are an essential part of the English language. They are words that are used in place of nouns to avoid repetition and make sentences more concise. There are several different types of pronouns, each serving a specific function in a sentence. Let’s explore some of the most common types of pronouns.

Subject Pronouns

Subject pronouns are used as the subject of a sentence. They perform the action or are associated with the verb in the sentence. Some examples of subject pronouns include:

  • I
  • You
  • He
  • She
  • It
  • We
  • They

Subject pronouns help us avoid repeating the noun in a sentence. For example, instead of saying “John is a doctor,” we can say “He is a doctor.”

Object Pronouns

Object pronouns are used as the object of a verb or preposition in a sentence. They receive the action of the verb or show the relationship between the verb and the noun. Some examples of object pronouns include:

  • Me
  • You
  • Him
  • Her
  • It
  • Us
  • Them

Object pronouns help us avoid repeating the noun as the object of a sentence. For example, instead of saying “John saw Mary,” we can say “He saw her.”

Possessive Pronouns

Possessive pronouns show ownership or possession. They indicate that something belongs to someone. Some examples of possessive pronouns include:

  • Mine
  • Yours
  • His
  • Hers
  • Its
  • Ours
  • Theirs

Possessive pronouns replace the need to use a noun and an apostrophe to show possession. For example, instead of saying “This is John’s car,” we can say “This car is his.”

Relative Pronouns

Relative pronouns are used to introduce relative clauses, which provide additional information about a noun. They connect the clause to the noun it describes. Some examples of relative pronouns include:

  • Who
  • Whom
  • Whose
  • Which
  • That

Relative pronouns help us avoid repeating the noun and make our sentences more concise. For example, instead of saying “John is a doctor. John is my friend,” we can say “John, who is my friend, is a doctor.”

Reflexive Pronouns

Reflexive pronouns are used when the subject and object of a sentence are the same. They reflect back to the subject and emphasize that the action is being performed by the subject. Some examples of reflexive pronouns include:

  • Myself
  • Yourself
  • Himself
  • Herself
  • Itself
  • Ourselves
  • Themselves

Reflexive pronouns add emphasis to the subject and are used in sentences like “I did it myself” or “She hurt herself.”

These are just a few of the different types of pronouns in the English language. Each type serves a specific function and helps us communicate more effectively. By using pronouns, we can avoid repetition and make our sentences more concise and clear. So, the next time you write or speak, remember to choose the appropriate pronoun to enhance your communication.

Pronoun Cases: Subjective, Objective, and Possessive

Subjective Case

In English grammar, pronouns have different forms depending on their function in a sentence. The subjective case is used when a pronoun is the subject of a sentence or clause. It is also used after linking verbs.

Subjective pronouns include I, you, he, she, it, we, and they. These pronouns are used to replace nouns that are the subject of a sentence. For example:

  • I went to the store.
  • She is a talented singer.
  • We are going on vacation.

Objective Case

The objective case is used when a pronoun is the object of a verb or a preposition. It is also used after certain verbs like see, hear, feel, and watch.

Objective pronouns include me, you, him, her, it, us, and them. These pronouns are used to replace nouns that are the object of a sentence. For example:

  • The teacher gave me a book.
  • Can you pass the salt to him?
  • I saw them at the park.

Possessive Case

The possessive case is used to show ownership or possession. Possessive pronouns can also be used to replace nouns that show ownership.

Possessive pronouns include mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, and theirs. These pronouns do not require an apostrophe. For example:

  • The car is mine.
  • Is this pen yours?
  • The house is theirs.

It is important to use the correct pronoun case to ensure clarity and accuracy in your writing. Using the wrong case can lead to confusion or grammatical errors. Remember to consider the function of the pronoun in the sentence and choose the appropriate case accordingly.

Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement

Definition of Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement

Pronoun-antecedent agreement is a grammatical concept that ensures that pronouns and their antecedents agree in number, gender, and person. A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun, while an antecedent is the noun that the pronoun refers to. When using pronouns, it is important to ensure that they match their antecedents in terms of singular or plural form, as well as gender and person.

In English grammar, there are various types of pronouns, including personal pronouns, possessive pronouns, reflexive pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, indefinite pronouns, relative pronouns, and interrogative pronouns. Each type of pronoun has its own function and usage in sentences.

To understand pronoun-antecedent agreement, let’s take a look at some examples.

Examples of Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement

  1. Personal Pronouns: Personal pronouns refer to specific people or things. They include pronouns like “I,” “you,” “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” and “they.” When using personal pronouns, it is important to ensure that they agree with their antecedents in terms of number and gender. For example:

  2. Incorrect: She left their bag at home.

  3. Correct: She left her bag at home.

  4. Possessive Pronouns: Possessive pronouns show ownership or possession. They include pronouns like “mine,” “yours,” “his,” “hers,” “ours,” and “theirs.” These pronouns should agree with their antecedents in terms of number and gender. For example:

  5. Incorrect: The books are hers’s.

  6. Correct: The books are hers.

  7. Reflexive Pronouns: Reflexive pronouns are used when the subject and object of a sentence refer to the same person or thing. They include pronouns like “myself,” “yourself,” “himself,” “herself,” “itself,” “ourselves,” and “themselves.” These pronouns should agree with their antecedents in terms of number and gender. For example:

  8. Incorrect: John and myself went to the store.

  9. Correct: John and I went to the store.

  10. Demonstrative Pronouns: Demonstrative pronouns are used to point out specific people or things. They include pronouns like “this,” “that,” “these,” and “those.” These pronouns should agree with their antecedents in terms of number. For example:

  11. Incorrect: This are my favorite books.

  12. Correct: These are my favorite books.

  13. Indefinite Pronouns: Indefinite pronouns refer to nonspecific people or things. They include pronouns like “someone,” “anyone,” “everyone,” “something,” “anything,” and “everything.” These pronouns should agree with their antecedents in terms of number. For example:

  14. Incorrect: Everyone should bring their own lunch.

  15. Correct: Everyone should bring his or her own lunch.

  16. Relative Pronouns: Relative pronouns are used to introduce relative clauses. They include pronouns like “who,” “whom,” “whose,” “which,” and “that.” These pronouns should agree with their antecedents in terms of number and gender. For example:

  17. Incorrect: The girl who lost their wallet.

  18. Correct: The girl who lost her wallet.

By ensuring proper pronoun-antecedent agreement, we can maintain clarity and coherence in our writing. Remember to pay attention to the number, gender, and person of pronouns to ensure they match their antecedents accurately.

Pronoun Errors and How to Avoid Them

Pronouns are an essential part of the English language, as they help us avoid repetition and make our sentences more concise. However, using pronouns incorrectly can lead to confusion and misunderstandings. In this article, we will explore two common types of pronoun errors – Pronoun Shifts and Pronoun Agreement Errors – and discuss how to avoid them.

Pronoun Shifts

Pronoun shifts occur when there is a sudden change in the pronoun being used within a sentence or paragraph. This can lead to confusion for the reader and disrupt the flow of the text. To avoid pronoun shifts, it is important to maintain consistency in the pronouns used throughout a sentence or paragraph.

Here are a few examples of pronoun shifts and how to correct them:

  1. Incorrect: I love reading books, and he enjoys watching movies. They are both great sources of entertainment.
    Correct: I love reading books, and he loves watching movies. Both are great sources of entertainment.

  2. Incorrect: Sarah went to the store, and she bought some groceries. Then you can put them away.
    Correct: Sarah went to the store and bought some groceries. Then she can put them away.

By ensuring that the pronouns used in a sentence or paragraph remain consistent, we can avoid pronoun shifts and maintain clarity in our writing.

Pronoun Agreement Errors

Pronoun agreement errors occur when there is a mismatch between the pronoun and its antecedent in terms of number, gender, or person. This can lead to confusion and grammatical errors. To avoid pronoun agreement errors, it is important to ensure that the pronoun agrees with its antecedent in terms of these factors.

Here are a few examples of pronoun agreement errors and how to correct them:

  1. Incorrect: Each of the students should bring their own textbook.
    Correct: Each of the students should bring his or her own textbook.

  2. Incorrect: The team celebrated their victory.
    Correct: The team celebrated its victory.

By paying attention to the number, gender, and person of the antecedent, we can ensure that our pronouns agree with their respective antecedents and maintain grammatical correctness.

Remember, pronouns play a crucial role in English grammar. They help us avoid repetition and make our sentences more concise. By understanding the different types of pronouns, their functions, and how to use them correctly, we can avoid pronoun errors and improve the clarity and effectiveness of our writing.

Now that you have a better understanding of pronoun errors and how to avoid them, you can confidently use pronouns in your writing without worrying about making mistakes. Happy writing!

Pronouns in Different Languages

Pronouns in French

In French, pronouns play an important role in communication, just like in English. Pronouns are used to replace nouns and avoid repetition. Let’s explore some common pronouns in French:

  1. Personal Pronouns: These pronouns are used to refer to people or things. They can be subject pronouns (je, tu, il/elle/on, nous, vous, ils/elles) or object pronouns (me, te, le/la, nous, vous, les).

  2. Possessive Pronouns: These pronouns indicate ownership. They agree in gender and number with the noun they replace. Examples include le mien/la mienne (mine), le tien/la tienne (yours), le sien/la sienne (his/hers), le nôtre/la nôtre (ours), le vôtre/la vôtre (yours), le leur/la leur (theirs).

  3. Reflexive Pronouns: These pronouns are used when the subject and object of a verb are the same. They are formed by adding “se” or “s’” to the appropriate personal pronoun. For example, “je me lave” (I wash myself), “tu te laves” (you wash yourself).

  4. Demonstrative Pronouns: These pronouns point to specific people or things. Examples include celui-ci (this one), celle-là (that one), ceux-ci (these ones), celles-là (those ones).

  5. Indefinite Pronouns: These pronouns refer to non-specific people or things. Examples include quelqu’un (someone), quelque chose (something), personne (no one), rien (nothing).

  6. Relative Pronouns: These pronouns introduce relative clauses and connect them to the main clause. Examples include qui (who/whom), que (that/which), dont (whose/of which), où (where).

  7. Interrogative Pronouns: These pronouns are used to ask questions. Examples include qui (who), que/qu’est-ce que (what), lequel/laquelle (which one), combien (how many/how much).

Pronouns in Spanish

Spanish, like French, also uses pronouns extensively. Let’s take a look at some common pronouns in Spanish:

  1. Personal Pronouns: Spanish personal pronouns have different forms depending on the subject’s grammatical person and number. Examples include yo (I), tú (you), él/ella/usted (he/she/you formal), nosotros/nosotras (we), vosotros/vosotras (you all), ellos/ellas/ustedes (they/you all).

  2. Possessive Pronouns: These pronouns indicate possession. They agree in gender and number with the noun they replace. Examples include mío/mía (mine), tuyo/tuya (yours), suyo/suya (his/hers/yours), nuestro/nuestra (ours), vuestro/vuestra (yours), suyo/suya (theirs/yours).

  3. Reflexive Pronouns: Spanish reflexive pronouns are used when the subject and object of a verb are the same. They are formed by adding “se” to the appropriate personal pronoun. For example, “me lavo” (I wash myself), “te lavas” (you wash yourself).

  4. Demonstrative Pronouns: These pronouns point to specific people or things. Examples include éste/ésta (this one), ése/ésa (that one), aquel/aquella (that one over there), estos/estas (these ones), esos/esas (those ones), aquellos/aquellas (those ones over there).

  5. Indefinite Pronouns: Spanish indefinite pronouns refer to non-specific people or things. Examples include alguien (someone), algo (something), nadie (no one), nada (nothing).

  6. Relative Pronouns: These pronouns introduce relative clauses and connect them to the main clause. Examples include que (who/whom/that), el/la que (the one who/whom/that), el/la cual (which), quien/quienes (who/whom), cuyo/cuya (whose).

  7. Interrogative Pronouns: These pronouns are used to ask questions. Examples include quién (who), qué (what), cuál (which one), cuántos/cuántas (how many), cómo (how).

Pronouns in Zulu

Zulu, a Bantu language spoken in South Africa, also has its own set of pronouns. Here are some examples:

  1. Personal Pronouns: Zulu personal pronouns have different forms depending on the subject’s grammatical person and number. Examples include ngi (I), u (you), u (he/she), si (we), ni (you all), ba (they).

  2. Possessive Pronouns: These pronouns indicate possession. They agree in gender and number with the noun they replace. Examples include wami (mine), wakho (yours), wakhe (his/hers), wethu (ours), wenu (yours), wabo (theirs).

  3. Reflexive Pronouns: Zulu reflexive pronouns are used when the subject and object of a verb are the same. They are formed by adding “ku-” to the appropriate personal pronoun. For example, “ngikhomba” (I wash myself), “ukukhomba” (you wash yourself).

  4. Demonstrative Pronouns: These pronouns point to specific people or things. Examples include lo (this one), lapho (that one), laphaya (that one over there), laba (these ones), lawa (those ones), labo (those ones over there).

  5. Indefinite Pronouns: Zulu indefinite pronouns refer to non-specific people or things. Examples include umuntu (someone), into (something), akuna (no one), akudingi (nothing).

  6. Relative Pronouns: These pronouns introduce relative clauses and connect them to the main clause. Examples include o (who/whom/that), lapho (where), lapho (which), abantu (who/whom), akhe (whose).

  7. Interrogative Pronouns: These pronouns are used to ask questions. Examples include ngubani (who), yini (what), yini (which one), ngemanga (how many), njani (how).

Pronouns in Afrikaans

Afrikaans, a language derived from Dutch, also has its own set of pronouns. Let’s take a look at some examples:

  1. Personal Pronouns: Afrikaans personal pronouns have different forms depending on the subject’s grammatical person and number. Examples include ek (I), jy (you), hy/sy (he/she), ons (we), julle (you all), hulle (they).

  2. Possessive Pronouns: These pronouns indicate possession. They agree in gender and number with the noun they replace. Examples include myne (mine), joune (yours), syne (his/hers), ons s’n (ours), julle s’n (yours), hulle s’n (theirs).

  3. Reflexive Pronouns: Afrikaans reflexive pronouns are used when the subject and object of a verb are the same. They are formed by adding “self” to the appropriate personal pronoun. For example, “ek was” (I wash myself), “jy was” (you wash yourself).

  4. Demonstrative Pronouns: These pronouns point to specific people or things. Examples include hierdie (this one), daardie (that one), daardie een (that one over there), hierdie (these ones), daardie (those ones), daardie een (those ones over there).

  5. Indefinite Pronouns: Afrikaans indefinite pronouns refer to non-specific people or things. Examples include iemand (someone), iets (something), niemand (no one), niks (nothing).

  6. Relative Pronouns: These pronouns introduce relative clauses and connect them to the main clause. Examples include wat (who/whom/that), waar (where), wat (which), wie (who/whom), wie se (whose).

  7. Interrogative Pronouns: These pronouns are used to ask questions. Examples include wie (who), wat (what), watter een (which one), hoeveel (how many), hoe (how).

That’s a brief overview of pronouns in different languages. Remember, pronouns are an essential part of language and help us communicate more efficiently.

Pronouns in Modern Context

Pronouns play a crucial role in language, allowing us to refer to people, objects, or ideas without constantly repeating their names. In English grammar, pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. They help us communicate more efficiently and avoid redundancy. Let’s explore the different types of pronouns and their usage in the English language.

Pronouns on Social Media Platforms like Instagram

In today’s digital age, social media platforms like Instagram have become an integral part of our lives. These platforms provide a space for self-expression and identity exploration. One aspect of this is the use of pronouns in user profiles. Pronouns on social media allow individuals to express their gender identity and be referred to in a way that aligns with their self-perception.

Using gender pronouns such as “he/him,” “she/her,” or “they/them” in social media bios helps create a more inclusive and respectful online environment. It allows people to be addressed in a manner that reflects their gender identity, regardless of societal norms or assumptions. This practice promotes acceptance and understanding, fostering a sense of belonging for individuals of diverse gender identities.

Gender Pronouns: He/She, They/Them

Gender pronouns are an essential aspect of language that reflects an individual’s gender identity. Traditionally, English grammar has used binary pronouns like “he” for males and “she” for females. However, as our understanding of gender expands, so does the need for inclusive language.

“They/them” pronouns are increasingly being used as gender-neutral pronouns. They are inclusive of individuals who identify outside the traditional gender binary. By using “they/them” pronouns, we acknowledge and respect the diverse gender identities that exist.

It is important to note that gender pronouns are personal and should be used as individuals prefer. It is always respectful to ask someone for their preferred pronouns rather than assuming. By using the correct pronouns, we create a more inclusive and affirming environment for everyone.

Pronouns are an integral part of modern communication, allowing us to express ourselves and respect the identities of others. Understanding the different types of pronouns and their usage helps us navigate language with inclusivity and respect. Whether it’s on social media platforms like Instagram or in everyday conversations, using the appropriate pronouns is a small but significant step towards creating a more inclusive society.

Practical Application of Pronouns

Pronouns are an essential part of the English language and are used to replace nouns in sentences. They help to avoid repetition and make our communication more efficient. Understanding the practical application of pronouns is crucial for effective writing and speaking. Let’s explore some examples of pronouns in sentences and learn when to capitalize them.

Examples of Pronouns in Sentences

To better understand the usage of pronouns, let’s take a look at some examples:

  1. Personal Pronouns: These pronouns refer to specific people or things. For example, “She is going to the store” or “They are playing in the park.”

  2. Possessive Pronouns: These pronouns show ownership. For instance, “That book is mine” or “Is this pen yours?”

  3. Reflexive Pronouns: These pronouns reflect back to the subject of the sentence. For example, “He hurt himself” or “She congratulated herself.”

  4. Demonstrative Pronouns: These pronouns point to specific people or things. For instance, “This is my car” or “Those are your shoes.”

  5. Indefinite Pronouns: These pronouns refer to non-specific people or things. For example, “Someone left their umbrella here” or “Everybody enjoyed the party.”

  6. Relative Pronouns: These pronouns introduce relative clauses and connect them to the main clause. For instance, “The book that I read was fascinating” or “The person who won the race is my friend.”

  7. Interrogative Pronouns: These pronouns are used to ask questions. For example, “Who is coming to the party?” or “Which color do you prefer?”

Understanding these different types of pronouns and their usage in sentences will help you communicate more effectively.

When to Capitalize Pronouns

In English, pronouns are generally not capitalized unless they appear at the beginning of a sentence. However, there are a few exceptions to this rule. Here are some instances when pronouns should be capitalized:

  1. I: The pronoun “I” is always capitalized, regardless of its position in a sentence. For example, “I went to the store” or “She and I are friends.”

  2. Pronoun at the beginning of a sentence: When a pronoun starts a sentence, it should be capitalized. For instance, “He is a talented musician” or “They went on a trip.”

  3. Pronoun used as a proper noun: If a pronoun is used as a proper noun, it should be capitalized. For example, “Please pass the salt to Aunt Mary” or “I saw Professor Johnson at the conference.”

Remembering these capitalization rules will help you use pronouns correctly in your writing.

Now that we have explored some examples of pronouns in sentences and learned when to capitalize them, you can apply this knowledge to enhance your communication skills. Using pronouns effectively will make your writing more concise and engaging. So, go ahead and practice incorporating pronouns into your everyday conversations and written work.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a pronoun subject?

A subject pronoun is a type of pronoun that is used as the subject of a sentence. Examples include “I”, “you”, “he”, “she”, “it”, “we”, and “they”. For instance, in the sentence “They are going to the park”, “They” is the subject pronoun.

When is a pronoun capitalized?

A pronoun is capitalized when it is used at the beginning of a sentence or when it refers to a proper noun. For instance, the pronoun “I” is always capitalized, and pronouns referring to specific people or places (like “He” in “He is President”) are also capitalized.

How many types of pronouns are there?

There are several types of pronouns in English, including personal pronouns, possessive pronouns, reflexive pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, indefinite pronouns, relative pronouns, and interrogative pronouns.

What is a pronoun definition?

A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun in a sentence. It can refer to people, places, things, or ideas without naming them directly. Examples include “he”, “she”, “it“, “they“, etc.

What is a pronoun error?

A pronoun error can occur when the pronoun used does not agree in number or gender with the noun it refers to, when the antecedent of the pronoun is unclear, or when the case of the pronoun is incorrect.

What is a pronoun and can you give examples?

A pronoun is a word that replaces a noun in a sentence. Examples of pronouns include “I”, “you”, “he”, “she”, “it”, “we“, “they“, “me“, “him“, “her“, “us“, and “them”.

What does a pronoun mean in grammar?

In grammar, a pronoun is a word that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase. It helps to avoid repetition and makes sentences easier to understand.

What is a pronoun on Instagram?

On Instagram, users often specify their preferred pronouns (like he/him, she/her, they/them) in their bio to let others know how they should be referred to.

What is a pronoun agreement?

Pronoun agreement refers to the grammatical rule that a pronoun must agree with its antecedent in number, gender, and person. For example, if the antecedent is singular, the pronoun must also be singular.

What is a pronoun case?

Pronoun case refers to the form a pronoun takes depending on its function in a sentence. There are three cases in English: subjective (I, you, he, she, it, we, they), objective (me, you, him, her, it, us, them), and possessive (my, your, his, her, its, our, their).